Towards a Two-party System

Polish SejmOpinion polls are showing a clear trend towards the development of a three-party system, if not even a two-party system in Poland. Seen as a mark of a solid democracy, this pattern may signal the end of party splintering and bickering in Poland.

Big Three
It might not, but there’s hope that three parties and three parties only – Civic Platform (PO), Law and Justice (PiS) and Left and Democrats (LiD) – will make up the next parliament and become rooted in the national consciousness as the ‘big three’.

No Populism
An end to populist League of the Polish Right (LPR) and Self-Defence (Samoobrona) may bring relief to a host of people, although the loss of the Polish Peasant Party (PSL) could be a sad moment.

Big Debate
Yesterday’s debate between (PiS) PM Kaczyński and former President (and LiD leader) Kwaśniewski showed that Kaczyński fears Donald Tusk and PO. The PM hopes that by agreeing to debate with Kwaśniewski (and not Tusk), LiD will slice a few percentage points off PO thereby allowing PiS to win.

Divide and Conquer
It is a dangerous game and one which could inadvertently lead to PiS losing the next elections. Kaczyński has already got rid of LPR and Self-Defence using his divide and conquer strategy but a similar strategy might not necessarily work with PO and LiD. What it will certainly do is strengthen core voter allegiances in all three parties.

Vote Hope
The only hope for a ‘normalisation’ of politics in Poland through the development of a three-party system is voter participation. Only a large turnout which matches the European average (of around 80%) will bring change to Polish politics. It is time for Poles to change the face of their country themselves.

2 Responses to Towards a Two-party System

  1. Jimbo says:

    80% is a European average? It wd surprise me if it were really that high. I think a wee bit of research would show it’s rather lower than that… a depressing trend of itself.

  2. rafuzar says:

    I think 80% is the average for western Europe and the eastern European average is around 70% if I remember correctly.

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